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Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Lupus: Key Points

…s Lupus is a disease that presents across a broad spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations. It may be cutaneous-only or systemic with cutaneous manifestations; some patients with systemic lupus do not have cutaneous involvement. Diagnostic…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Borreliosis (Lyme Disease): Key Points

…th various Borrelia species causes borreliosis, which may have cutaneous and systemic manifestations. This infection is transmitted through bites of the Ixodes species of ticks. Early Lyme disease (erythema chronicum migrans) and late Lyme disease (a…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Sarcoidosis: Key Points

…ough evaluation, as patients may have more than one diagnosis. Cutaneous sarcoidosis generally affects 25-30% of patients with the disease; this number varies depending on the ethnic group. Cutaneous sarcoidosis is generally divided into “specific le…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Creeping Eruption, Larva Migrans, and Larva Currens: Overview

Treatment Cutaneous Larva Migrans (CLM) [The treatment for larva currens is somewhat different so the two diseases are discussed separately.] Cutaneous larva migrans is due to animal (usually canine) hookworm. It presents as serpiginous papules on t…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Urticaria Pigmentosa / Mastocytosis: Key Points

…r/spleen/lymphatic tissues Urticaria pigmentosa is a form of cutaneous mastocytosis most common in childhood, characterized by brown papules, plaques, or nodules, which may urticate when stroked. Patients with cutaneous mastocytosis may have a si…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Kaposi’s Sarcoma: Overview

…. The following staging system may be used: Stage I: Localized cutaneous (fewer than 10 lesions, or one anatomic region); Stage II: Disseminated cutaneous (more than 10 lesions, or more than one anatomic area); Stage III: Visceral only; Stage IV: Cut…

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