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Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Drug Eruptions: Suggested Reading

Suggested Reading Mockenhaupt M et al (2008). Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: assessment of medication risks with emphasis on recently marketed drugs. The EuroSCAR-Study. JID 128: 35. Friedmann PS, Pickard C, Ardern-Jones M,…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Drug Eruptions: Therapy

Therapy First-line therapy: Prompt identification and discontinuation of the offending agent is an essential first step. In most cases, the cutaneous reaction will resolve in 2-5 days without therapy; patients may continue to get new lesions during…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Leprosy/Hansen’s Disease and Reactional States: Overview

Overview Optimal therapeutic regimens for Hansen’s disease (HD) have not been established by comparative controlled trials. Therapy is determined primarily by the bacillary load (i.e., multibacillary vs. paucibacillary). Multibacillary patient…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Drug Eruptions: Initial Evaluation

Initial Evaluation Introduction Adverse reactions to medications are common, and cutaneous drug eruptions may occur in 3% of all hospitalized patients who are receiving medications. They can represent 1% of consultations in office-based dermatology…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Treatment

First-line therapy: ┬áThe first-line therapy for DH is oral dapsone once each day (100 mg daily dose). Dapsone should be started after G6PD screening is performed. A dramatic clinical response is expected within 4-5 days. Reevaluate the patient afte…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Erythema Elevatum Diutinum: Treatment

First-line therapy: The first-line therapy for EED is oral dapsone once each day (50-100 mg daily dose). Alternative steps Intralesional triamcinolone acetonide 2.5-5 mg/cc may be used if there are few lesions. Niacinamide, colchicine, hydroxychlor…

Resolving Quandaries in Dermatology, Pathology & Dermatopathology

Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia/Kimura’s Disease?

…ndani PL, Sabesan T, Hussein K. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia masquerading as Kimura disease. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2005;43(3):249-52. Although angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia and Kimura’s disease have some clini…

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