1 2 3 14
A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Atypical Mycobacterial Infections

  • at009g01.jpg
  • at009g02.jpg
  • at009g03.jpg
  • at009g04.jpg
  • at009g05.jpg
  • at009g06.jpg
  • at009g07.jpg
  • at009g08.jpg
  • at009g09.jpg
  • at009eg001.jpg

Infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue by atypical mycobacteria, that is, mycobacteria other than those responsible for tuberculosis and leprosy, expressed clinically as keratotic and crusted papules, plaques, nodules, and tumors that may be punctuated by draining sinuses and by ulcers.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Basal-Cell Carcinoma

  • at010g01.jpg
  • at010g02.jpg
  • at010g03.jpg
  • at010g04.jpg
  • at010g05.jpg
  • at010g06.jpg
  • at010g07.jpg
  • at010g08.jpg
  • at010g09.jpg
  • at010g10.jpg

A malignant neoplasm made up of abnormal germinative cells analogous to those that compose the folliculosebaceous-apocrine germ in an embryo and that usually manifests clinically as a papule or nodule which may become ulcerated.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Deep Fungal Infections

  • at016g01.jpg
  • at016g02.jpg
  • at016g03.jpg
  • at016g04.jpg
  • at016g05.jpg
  • at016g06.jpg
  • at016g07.jpg
  • at016g08.jpg
  • at016g09.jpg
  • at016g10.jpg

Cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions, usually nodules, that have become keratotic, crusted, and ulcerated as a consequence of infection by a variety of deep fungi, i.e., fungi situated in the dermis and subcutis, some of which may be disseminated to other organs.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Keratosis Pilaris/Lichen Spinulosus

  • at044g01.jpg
  • at044g02.jpg
  • at044g03.jpg

Keratotic spikes that emerge from dilated ostia of infundibula and are equidistant from one another.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Leprosy

  • at046g01.jpg
  • at046g02.jpg
  • at046g03.jpg
  • at046g04.jpg
  • at046g05.jpg
  • at046g06.jpg
  • at046g07.jpg
  • at046g08.jpg
  • at046g09.jpg
  • at046g10.jpg

An inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Seborrheic Keratosis, Including Solar Lentigo

  • at087g01.jpg
  • at087g02.jpg
  • at087g03.jpg
  • at087g04.jpg
  • at087g05.jpg
  • at087g06.jpg
  • at087g07.jpg
  • at087g08.jpg
  • at087g09.jpg
  • at087g10.jpg

A benign neoplasm of keratinocytes that consists of pigmented macules, papules, and plaques distributed on sun-exposed sites for a solar lentigo and the reticulated type of seborrheic keratosis, which represents a later stage of solar lentigo, and on the trunk mostly for other types of seborrheic keratosis unrelated to solar lentigo.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Squamous-Cell Carcinoma

  • at089g01.jpg
  • at089g02.jpg
  • at089g03a.jpg
  • at089g03b.jpg
  • at089g04.jpg
  • at089g05.jpg
  • at089g06.jpg
  • at089g07.jpg
  • at089g08a.jpg
  • at089g08b.jpg

A malignant neoplasm of keratinocytes that when present as a keratotic macule or papule on skin damaged badly by sunlight is referred to as solar keratosis.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Syringoma

  • at093g01.jpg
  • at093g02.jpg
  • at093g03.jpg
  • at093g04.jpg
  • at093g05a.jpg
  • at093g05b.jpg
  • at093eg001a.jpg
  • at093eg001b.jpg
  • at093eg002.jpg

A benign neoplasm of apocrine ductal nature within the upper half of the dermis that manifests itself clinically as tiny, smooth, skin-colored, round or oblong papules that usually are situated in periorbital skin, but may be seen on other sites, such as the neck or genitalia, or even be widespread.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Tinea Versicolor

  • at094g01.jpg
  • at094g02.jpg
  • at094g03.jpg
  • at094g04.jpg
  • at094g05.jpg
  • at094g06.jpg
  • at094g07.jpg
  • at094g08.jpg
  • at094g09.jpg

An inflammatory disease caused by the fungus Malassezia furfur, the organisms of which proliferate in a slightly thickened stratum corneum.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Xanthomas, Including Xanthogranulomas

  • at101g01.jpg
  • at101g02.jpg
  • at101g03a.jpg
  • at101g03b.jpg
  • at101g04.jpg
  • at101g05.jpg
  • at101g06a.jpg
  • at101g06b.jpg
  • at101g06c.jpg
  • at101g07.jpg

Deposits of lipid in the skin and sometimes in subcutaneous tissues as a consequence often, but not always, of hyperlipidemia.

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Leprosy

…mpetent immunologically have patches or plaques of tuberculoid leprosy, whereas those who are immunologically incompetent have nodules and tumors of lepromatous leprosy. When features of both tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy are present together i…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Leprosy/Hansen’s Disease and Reactional States

…mpetent immunologically have patches or plaques of tuberculoid leprosy, whereas those who are immunologically incompetent have nodules and tumors of lepromatous leprosy. When features of both tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy are present together i…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Leprosy/Hansen’s Disease and Reactional States: Overview

…the tuberculoid pole). Paucibacillary patients are those with indeterminate, pure tuberculoid, and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (less than 3-5 skin lesions), in which organisms are absent. The identification of any mycobacteria in the tissue, or t…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Drug Eruptions: Therapy

…ontinuation of the offending agent is an essential first step. In most cases, the cutaneous reaction will resolve in 2-5 days without therapy; patients may continue to get new lesions during this time. Supportive therapy: Antihistamines, such as hyd…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Spider Bites: Key Points

…ideration in the differential diagnosis of a spider bite is an infectious abscess. Introduction Most spider bites commonly result in mild, local inflammation but can result in localized tissue necrosis in severe cases. Systemic symptoms and fatal re…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Stings: Treatment

…agement for anaphylaxis, as described below, may be necessary. Intravenous calcium gluconate 10% solution, 10 ml may benefit patients with severe toxic reactions. This should be given in a hospital setting. Infusions may need to be repeated at 1- to…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Photosensitivity Dermatoses: Overview

…time the medication was started. General Therapy First Steps In phototoxic or photoallergic drug reactions, the offending agent, which may include, among other drugs, thiazide diuretics, sulfonamides, quinidine, tetracyclines, captopril, phenothiaz…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Papular Urticaria: Treatment

…minate the arthropod source and to then suppress the resultant inflammatory reaction. First-line management of the inflammatory reaction involves three basic steps: Treat the patient’s hypersensitivity reaction: Prescribe oral antihistamines (e.g.,…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Papular Urticaria: Key Points

…ites are the most common causes of papular urticaria. There is increased seasonal incidence of papular urticaria during the spring and summer months. It is important to note that the bites of many insects can trigger hypersensitivity reactions only i…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Key Points

…allergic origin. Distinguishing between these entities can be informed by a careful history, including timing of onset of symptoms. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), or Type IV hypersensitivity, reaction

1 2 3 14