Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Stings: Key Points

Key Points The order hymenoptera includes bees, wasps, hornets, and ants. Hymenoptera stings cause toxic and allergic reactions that present across a broad clinical spectrum: from mild, localized reactions to severe, systemic, and potentially fatal…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Stings: Treatment

Treatment Local toxic reactions Initial therapy First-line therapy: Remove all embedded stingers (if present) as promptly as possible, as venom continues to be injected after the stinger is detached from the insect. Do not squeeze or pick up the s…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Atypical Mycobacterial Infections: Overview

Overview Although several mycobacterial organisms have been associated with skin lesions, only two, M. fortuitum/chelonei/abscessus (Group IV, rapid growers) and M. marinum, are common pathogens. Diagnosis requires culture to identify the causative…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Venous Stasis: Treatment

Treatment Stasis dermatitis First-line therapy: The first-line therapy for stasis dermatitis includes control of edema, if possible, and use of an anti-inflammatory topical medication such as a medium potency topical corticosteroid. Stasis dermati…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Venous Stasis: References

References http://www.gmpublichealthpracticeunit.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Lower-limb-chronic-venous-insufficiency-including-Varicose-Veins-Referral-Recommendations.pdf Bailey E, Kroshinsky D. (2011) Cellulitis: diagnosis and management, D…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Scabies: Principles of Management of Scabies

Principles of Management of Scabies Initial therapy First line: Topical 5% permethrin cream, applied overnight to entire body except face, hair-bearing scalp. Rinse thoroughly and follow decontamination protocol. Treat patient and all household mem…

A Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases

Acne Vulgaris

A disease of infundibulosebaceous units, especially infundibula, that may manifest itself solely as noninflammatory lesions, i.e., comedones and intact cysts, or as inflammatory lesions, i.e., papules, nodules, and pustules. The process may resolve…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Superficial Fungal Infections: Therapy: Pityrosporum folliculitis

Therapy: Pityrosporum folliculitis Occasionally the organism causing TV, or its relative pityrosporum orbiculare, will cause a folliculitis without the typical dermatitis of TV. In most individuals, who are typically young adults, this infection is…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Sweet’s Syndrome (Acute Febrile Neutrophil Dermatosis): Key Points

Key Points Indurated, often painful, erythematous nodules are the characteristic skin lesion that marks Sweet’s syndrome. Skin lesions may be bullous or cellulitis-like (pseudocellulitic) in appearance. Skin lesions of Sweet’s syndrome are often ac…

Therapeutic Strategies in Dermatology

Alopecia: Key Points

Key Points Alopecia, or hair loss, has a broad spectrum of causes. In order to appropriately treat alopecia, the type of hair loss or pathophysiology must be clearly identified. The evaluation for hair loss requires a very thorough history and phys…