Clinical Reference / Clinical Atlas / Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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Fig. 89-61

Squamous cell carcinoma: A humongous, vegetating, ulcerated example that proved to be lethal.


Fig. 89-62

Squamous cell carcinoma: This ultimately fatal, vegetating, ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma began innocuously, decades previously, as a solar keratosis, that is, as a very superficial squamous cell carcinoma of one type.


Fig. 89-63

Squamous cell carcinoma: An ulcerated, scaly, crusted tumor that has distorted the face markedly.


Fig. 89-64

Keratoacanthoma: This keratoacanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma is in the process of involution as evidenced by the whitish scar in the center of the surface of it. The patient also has rosacea. The skin-colored papule above the nasium is a Miescher’s nevus.


Fig. 89-65

Squamous cell carcinoma: Several ulcerated, crusted examples in company with “solar keratoses,” the latter being a superficial expression of the very same process. Numerous scars on the face bear testimony to treatment previously with x-rays and surgery.


Fig. 89-66

Squamous cell carcinoma: A huge, ulcerated tumor is accompanied by solar keratoses and solar lentigenes, the former being incipient squamous cell carcinomas and the latter beginning seborrheic keratoses.


Fig. 89-67

Squamous cell carcinoma: A vegetating, ulcerated, purulent tumor.


Fig. 89-68

Squamous cell carcinoma: This ulcerated tumor is situated in an ill-defined, but broad, plaque of Bowen’s disease. Bowen’s disease and solar keratosis are simply names for different types of squamous cell carcinoma situated superficially.


Fig. 89-69 A

Solar keratosis: All of the keratotic lesions pictured here, some of them situated on a reddish base, are one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-69 B

Solar keratosis: All of the keratotic lesions pictured here, some of them situated on a reddish base, are one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-70

Bowen’s disease: On the lateral aspect of the wrist is a rust-colored asymmetrical plaque which represents one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma. The tan and brown lesions are in the spectrum of solar lentigo/seborrheic keratosis. The badly wrinkled skin is testimony to injurious effects of ultraviolet light over the course of many years.


Fig. 89-71

Squamous cell carcinoma: An ulcerated, papillated tumor is covered by purulent material.


Fig. 89-72

Solar keratosis: A keratotic papule surrounded by erythema is termed, conventionally, a solar keratosis, but, in reality, it is a superficial squamous cell carcinoma of one type. All of the flat and slightly elevated pigmented lesions are solar lentigenes.


Fig. 89-73 A

Squamous cell carcinoma: The large crateriform lesion on the temple is a keratoacanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma and the smaller ulcerated lesion in the nasolabial fold is a basal cell carcinoma. Scaly lesions on the nose, forehead, and cheek, designated, conventionally, solar keratoses, are superficial squamous cell carcinomas of one type.


Fig. 89-73 B

Squamous cell carcinoma: The large crateriform lesion on the temple is a keratoacanthomatous squamous-cell carcinoma and the smaller ulcerated lesion in the nasolabial fold is a basal cell carcinoma. Scaly lesions on the nose, forehead, and cheek, designated, conventionally, solar keratoses, are superficial squamous cell carcinomas of one type.