Clinical Reference / Clinical Atlas / Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Solar Keratosis: Distribution and Individual Lesions

Fig. 89-1

Many keratotic papules of solar keratosis.


Fig. 89-2

Numerous closely-set keratotic papules of solar keratosis.


Fig. 89-3 A

Numerous closely-set and confluent papules of solar keratosis, superficial squamous cell carcinomas all.


Fig. 89-3 B

Numerous closely-set and confluent papules of solar keratosis, superficial squamous cell carcinomas all.


Fig. 89-4

Confluence of keratotic lesions of solar keratosis.


Fig. 89-5

Solar keratoses and solar lentigines (the brown macules).


Fig. 89-6

Solar keratoses and solar lentigines (the brown macules).


Solar Keratosis: Chronological Sequence

Fig. 89-7

Squamous cell carcinomas at stages of evolution from keratotic macules of solar keratosis to keratotic papules.


Fig. 89-8 A

Scaly lesions represent superficial squamous cell carcinomas (solar keratoses), whereas eroded lesions are deeper squamous cell carcinomas (solar keratotic type).


Fig. 89-8 B

Scaly lesions represent superficial squamous cell carcinomas (solar keratoses), whereas eroded lesions are deeper squamous cell carcinomas (solar keratotic type).


Fig. 89-9

Spectrum of lesions of squamous cell carcinoma from keratotic macules of solar keratosis to keratotic plaques.


Fig. 89-10

A keratotic plaque is a thick squamous cell carcinoma, and keratotic papules (solar keratoses) are thin carcinomas.


Bowen's Disease: Distribution and Individual Lesions

Fig. 89-11 A

A plaque of Bowen’s disease and papules of solar keratosis, all superficial squamous cell carcinomas.


Fig. 89-11 B

A plaque of Bowen’s disease and papules of solar keratosis, all superficial squamous cell carcinomas.


Fig. 89-12

Keratotic plaques of Bowen’s disease in company with papules of solar keratosis.


Fig. 89-13

Eroded scaly plaque of Bowen’s disease.


Fig. 89-14

Scaly plaque of Bowen’s disease with various shades of brown.


Fig. 89-15

Ulcerated plaque of squamous cell carcinoma (erythroplasia of Queyrat). The findings are the same as Bowen’s disease.


Fig. 89-16

Numerous reddish brown plaques of Bowen’s disease and an ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen’s type.


Fig. 89-17

Scaly crusted plaque of Bowen’s disease.


Fig. 89-18

Scaly crusted plaque.


Bowen's Disease: Chronological Sequence

Fig. 89-19

Scaly crusted plaque.


Fig. 89-20

Scaly crusted plaque.


Fig. 89-21

Large scaly crusted plaque.


Fig. 89-22

Pigmented plaque.


Bowen's Disease: Variations

Fig. 89-23

Pigmented plaques.


Bowenoid Papulosis

Fig. 89-24 A

Pigmented papules and plaques.


Fig. 89-24 B

Pigmented papules and plaques.


Fig. 89-25

Perianal plaques.


Fig. 89-26

Papules of bowenoid papulosis.


Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Unmodified: Distribution and Individual Lesions

Fig. 89-27

Ulcerated, crusted plaque/tumor.


Fig. 89-28

Ulcerated crusted squamous cell carcinoma surrounded by numerous telangiectases.


Fig. 89-29

Ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma covered by hemorrhagic crusts.


Fig. 89-30

Markedly keratotic ulcerated plaque.


Fig. 89-31

Ulcerated plaque with a mammillated center.


Fig. 89-32

Sessile, ulcerated, crusted tumor.


Fig. 89-33

Ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma in company with several solar keratoses on the fingers.


Fig. 89-34

Ulcerated subungual squamous cell carcinoma and a solar lentigo on the dorsum of a hand.


Fig. 89-35

Ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma with an elevated, smooth-surfaced, papillated rim.


Fig. 89-36

Papules forming a plaque with a central ulcer.


Fig. 89-37

Incipient squamous cell carcinoma manifested by whiteness, erosions, and crusts (“actinic cheilitis”).


Fig. 89-38

Keratotic ulcerated plaque of squamous cell carcinoma on the lip.


Fig. 89-39

Squamous cell carcinoma evidenced by whiteness, crusts, and deep ulcers.


Fig. 89-40

A plaque of squamous cell carcinoma characterized by a markedly keratotic surface and by fissures.


Fig. 89-41

An ulcerated crusted squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-42

An ulcerated, crusted, keratotic squamous cell carcinoma.


Verrucous Carcinoma

Fig. 89-43

Verrucous carcinoma of the buccal mucosa (oral florid papillomatosis)at different stages.


Fig. 89-44

An ulcerated, crusted, papillated verrucous carcinoma on the sole (carcinoma cuniculatum).


Fig. 89-45

A verrucous carcinoma on the sole (carcinoma cuniculatum).


Fig. 89-46

An ulcerated crusted tumor on a stump (verrucous carcinoma).


Fig. 89-47

Cauliflower-like mass of verrucous carcinoma on the vulva and perianal region (giant condyloma).


Keratoacanthoma

Fig. 89-48

The tumor with a keratotic center is a keratoacanthoma. At its left is a plaque of Bowen’s disease.


Fig. 89-49

A tumor of keratoacanthoma with a central crater devoid of a keratotic plug is surrounded by solar keratoses.


Fig. 89-50

Rising from the center of the keratoacanthoma is a dome-shaped keratotic mass.


Fig. 89-51

A keratoacanthoma surrounded by solar keratoses; two different types of squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-52

Dome-shaped nodule of kerato-acanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma with a central horn-filled crater.


Fig. 89-53

Dome-shaped keratoacanthoma with a central crater filled with horny material.


Fig. 89-54

Dome-shaped keratoacanthoma punctuated by a central crater plugged with horny material.


Cutaneous Horns

Fig. 89-55

A superficial squamous cell carcinoma (solar keratosis) produced the column of horn.


Fig. 89-56

A squamous cell carcinoma, solar keratotic type, manufactured the column of horn.


Fig. 89-57

A column of horn represents the product of maturation of abnormal keratinocytes of a squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-58

A stubby column of horn sits atop the rest of a squamous cell carcinoma, presumably solar keratotic type.


Complication

Fig. 89-59

Squamous cell carcinoma that developed in an atrophic scar caused by radiation therapy.


Proliferating Tricholemmal Cystic

Fig. 89-60

Fungating ulcerated example of proliferating tricholemmal cystic carcinoma, not a true squamous cell carcinoma.


New! Additional Images

Fig. 89-61

Squamous cell carcinoma: A humongous, vegetating, ulcerated example that proved to be lethal.


Fig. 89-62

Squamous cell carcinoma: This ultimately fatal, vegetating, ulcerated squamous cell carcinoma began innocuously, decades previously, as a solar keratosis, that is, as a very superficial squamous cell carcinoma of one type.


Fig. 89-63

Squamous cell carcinoma: An ulcerated, scaly, crusted tumor that has distorted the face markedly.


Fig. 89-64

Keratoacanthoma: This keratoacanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma is in the process of involution as evidenced by the whitish scar in the center of the surface of it. The patient also has rosacea. The skin-colored papule above the nasium is a Miescher’s nevus.


Fig. 89-65

Squamous cell carcinoma: Several ulcerated, crusted examples in company with “solar keratoses,” the latter being a superficial expression of the very same process. Numerous scars on the face bear testimony to treatment previously with x-rays and surgery.


Fig. 89-66

Squamous cell carcinoma: A huge, ulcerated tumor is accompanied by solar keratoses and solar lentigenes, the former being incipient squamous cell carcinomas and the latter beginning seborrheic keratoses.


Fig. 89-67

Squamous cell carcinoma: A vegetating, ulcerated, purulent tumor.


Fig. 89-68

Squamous cell carcinoma: This ulcerated tumor is situated in an ill-defined, but broad, plaque of Bowen’s disease. Bowen’s disease and solar keratosis are simply names for different types of squamous cell carcinoma situated superficially.


Fig. 89-69 A

Solar keratosis: All of the keratotic lesions pictured here, some of them situated on a reddish base, are one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-69 B

Solar keratosis: All of the keratotic lesions pictured here, some of them situated on a reddish base, are one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma.


Fig. 89-70

Bowen’s disease: On the lateral aspect of the wrist is a rust-colored asymmetrical plaque which represents one type of superficial squamous cell carcinoma. The tan and brown lesions are in the spectrum of solar lentigo/seborrheic keratosis. The badly wrinkled skin is testimony to injurious effects of ultraviolet light over the course of many years.


Fig. 89-71

Squamous cell carcinoma: An ulcerated, papillated tumor is covered by purulent material.


Fig. 89-72

Solar keratosis: A keratotic papule surrounded by erythema is termed, conventionally, a solar keratosis, but, in reality, it is a superficial squamous cell carcinoma of one type. All of the flat and slightly elevated pigmented lesions are solar lentigenes.


Fig. 89-73 A

Squamous cell carcinoma: The large crateriform lesion on the temple is a keratoacanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma and the smaller ulcerated lesion in the nasolabial fold is a basal cell carcinoma. Scaly lesions on the nose, forehead, and cheek, designated, conventionally, solar keratoses, are superficial squamous cell carcinomas of one type.


Fig. 89-73 B

Squamous cell carcinoma: The large crateriform lesion on the temple is a keratoacanthomatous squamous-cell carcinoma and the smaller ulcerated lesion in the nasolabial fold is a basal cell carcinoma. Scaly lesions on the nose, forehead, and cheek, designated, conventionally, solar keratoses, are superficial squamous cell carcinomas of one type.