Search Results for: nerves

Histologic Diagnosis of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

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…ulosis and hyperkeratosis, it must have been rubbed persistently and forcefully, probably because of effects pruritogenic on nerves of enzymes released from neutrophils. Those effects could be the reason for the implacable pruritus associated with…

Differential Diagnosis in Dermatopathology

Differential Diagnosis

…ined to the dermis, except for tuberous and tendinous types that affect the subcutaneous fat 11. Granular cells in cutaneous nerves 11. No foam cells in cutaneous nerves 12. Little fibrosis 12. Marked fibrosis at times 13. No extracellular lipid 13….

Resolving Quandaries in Dermatology, Pathology & Dermatopathology

Nevus Cells, Nevocytes, and Nevomelanocytes?

…dermis being derived from epidermal melanocytes, and nevomelanocytes in the lower dermis being derived from Schwann cells of nerves.” Rhodes AR. Neoplasms: benign neoplasias, hyperplasias, and dysplasias of melanocytes. In: Fitzpatrick TB,…

Resolving Quandaries in Dermatology, Pathology & Dermatopathology

Origin of Adnexal Neoplasms?

…gin of adnexal neoplasms, i.e., whether they derive from follicles, sebaceous units, apocrine units, eccrine units, muscles, nerves, or vessels (blood or lymphatic); only the direction of differentiation can be inferred. On the basis of study of…

Spitz and Reed nevi: acquired or congenital?

Spitz and Reed nevi: acquired or congenital?

…al nevi, in particular, infiltration of the reticular dermis or subcutis and involvement of cutaneous appendages, vessels or nerves. As a common finding, melanocytes splay between collagen bundles singly or in double rows [4,10,11]. Recently, the…

What is Rosacea?

What is Rosacea?

…hypothesize that rosacea stems from a constellation of abnormalities of skin, including of small cutaneous blood vessels and nerves, the surrounding connective tissue and an abnormal inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation is the hallmark of…

Differential Diagnosis in Dermatopathology

Discussions

…itself clinically as a rapidly growing mass that may be slightly painful or tender. When the process impinges on peripheral nerves, numbness, paresthesias, or pain may ensue. The lesion favors the chest wall, back, and volar aspect of the forearm…